sublim-ature:

Edisto Island, South CarolinaMichael Woloszynowicz

sublim-ature:

Edisto Island, South Carolina
Michael Woloszynowicz

malcolmxing:

by me
simp-licity:

fawun:

I’m done with this website

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simp-licity:

fawun:

I’m done with this website

WHAT IS THIS HAHAHA

(Source: gifdrome)

psychofactz:

More Facts on Psychofacts :)
laekoa:

scorpio-tales:

basically tree porn

☮nature, vintage, hippie blog☮ following back similar

laekoa:

scorpio-tales:

basically tree porn

☮nature, vintage, hippie blog☮ following back similar

(Source: earth-witch)

(Source: idealmente)

musts:

Foggy Redwoods by Chad Freeman
“We are creatures of the cosmos and have always hungered to know our origins to understand our connection with the universe. We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.”
Carl Sagan (via sci-universe)

(Source: lips-smacker)

spaceplasma:

Metallicity

In astronomy and physical cosmology, the metallicity of an object is the proportion of its matter made up of chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium. Because stars, which comprise most of the visible matter in the universe, are composed mostly of hydrogen and helium, astronomers use for convenience the blanket term “metal” to describe all other elements collectively. Thus, a nebula rich in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon would be “metal-rich” in astrophysical terms even though those elements are non-metals in chemistry. This term should not be confused with the usual definition of “metal”; metallic bonds are impossible within stars, and the very strongest chemical bonds are only possible in the outer layers of cool K and M stars. Earth-like chemistry therefore has little or no relevance in stellar interiors.
The metallicity of an astronomical object may provide an indication of its age. When the universe first formed, according to the Big Bang theory, it consisted almost entirely of hydrogen which, through primordial nucleosynthesis, created a sizeable proportion of helium and only trace amounts of lithium and beryllium and no heavier elements. Therefore, older stars have lower metallicities than younger stars such as our Sun.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, and H. Richer (University of British Columbia)

spaceplasma:

Metallicity

In astronomy and physical cosmology, the metallicity of an object is the proportion of its matter made up of chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium. Because stars, which comprise most of the visible matter in the universe, are composed mostly of hydrogen and helium, astronomers use for convenience the blanket term “metal” to describe all other elements collectively. Thus, a nebula rich in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon would be “metal-rich” in astrophysical terms even though those elements are non-metals in chemistry. This term should not be confused with the usual definition of “metal”; metallic bonds are impossible within stars, and the very strongest chemical bonds are only possible in the outer layers of cool K and M stars. Earth-like chemistry therefore has little or no relevance in stellar interiors.

The metallicity of an astronomical object may provide an indication of its age. When the universe first formed, according to the Big Bang theory, it consisted almost entirely of hydrogen which, through primordial nucleosynthesis, created a sizeable proportion of helium and only trace amounts of lithium and beryllium and no heavier elements. Therefore, older stars have lower metallicities than younger stars such as our Sun.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, and H. Richer (University of British Columbia)

(Source: onehundrednorth)